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GMAT SC – Nouns And Pronouns

GMAT SC – Nouns And Pronouns

NOUNS AND PRONOUNS :

A noun is a word used to name a person, animal, place, object, and an abstract idea. A noun can function in a sentence as a subject, a direct object, an indirect object, a subject complement, an object complement, an appositive, an adjective or an adverb.

Grammarians have developed a whole series of noun types, including the proper noun, the common noun, the concrete noun, the abstract noun, the countable noun, the non-countable noun (mass noun) and the collective noun. Of course, these categories are so narrowly constructed that no noun can belong solely to one category; it will be proper or common, abstract or concrete, countable, non-countable or collective. Thereby, it can be a common noun that is abstract and non-countable. But it cannot be a Proper noun that is common too, or a concrete noun that is abstract too.

Do’s and Don’ts

A pronoun is a word that replaces a noun or a group of words used as a noun. It acts as a substitute for a noun, and can be expressed both as a subject (Subjective) and as an object (Objective). 

Pronouns are as wide a descriptive as nouns are, and are thus classified into eight different categories:

Personal PronounsPossessive Pronouns, Reflexive/Intensive Pronouns, Reciprocal Pronouns, Relative Pronouns, Demonstrative Pronouns, Indefinite Pronouns and Interrogative Pronouns.

Of these, Personal Pronouns are used in the context of referring to the first person, second person and third person in speech:

Personal Pronouns First Person Second Person Third Person Impersonal
Subjective Singular

Plural

I

we

you

you

she, he,

they

it

they

Objective Singular

Plural

me

us

you

you

her, him

them

it

them

Possessive Subjective Singular

Plural

my 

our

your

your

her, his

their

its

theirs

Possessive Objective Singular

Plural

mine

ours

yours 

your

hers, his

theirs  

its

theirs

Here’s a table illustrating the various kinds of pronouns used for the other 7 categories:

Possessive Pronouns Mine, yours, his, her, ours, theirs
Reflexive/Intensive Pronouns Myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, oneself, ourselves, yourselves, themselves
Reciprocal Pronouns Each other, One another
Relative Pronouns That, which, who, whose, whom, where, when
Demonstrative Pronouns This, that, these, those
Indefinite Pronouns Anything, anybody, anyone, something, somebody, some, nothing, nobody, none, no one
Interrogative Pronouns Who, what , why, where, when, whatever

While this table is helpful for quick reference, it is important to remember that these categories merely assign roles to the pronouns. They , by no means, assign usage to these pronouns in the table. They have only been mentioned in the respective columns because they are the most commonly used in that category. They can easily be used in any other category as well, depending on the context of the sentence. For example, “whom” can be used in the “Interrogative” context : “To whom do you wish to speak?” For this example, bear in mind that “whom” acts as the object of the preposition “to”. It is useful to remember that the pronoun “whom” is ALWAYS used as an object of a verb, preposition or a verbal, as opposed to “who, which is always used as a subject. 



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