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How to Destroy your GMAT with all the Wrong Reasons

How to Destroy your GMAT with all the Wrong Reasons

It is not uncommon for some of the smartest MBA candidates to perform badly in their GMAT exam purely because of lack of confidence and practice. Many experts believe that about 7% of your academic success is attributed to self-esteem and confidence levels. In fact, sometimes even fake confidence and the right body language can help you conquer the beast that is the GMAT.

Destroy your GMAT with to Lack of Confidence

GMAT students who are not confident tend to be chronically afraid of competitive exams and on test day, tend to spend more time than necessary on unnecessary thoughts such as – I wonder if the reader will like my essay? Was my answer to the last question correct? I think I will die if I ruin this exam.

All these thoughts can get a student nowhere good and tend to be a huge waste of emotional and mental strength – especially on the day of the exam. This approach can lead to second-guessing oneself constantly, forcing candidates to waste valuable time in double or triple checking their answers.

Overcoming Lack of Confidence

Many students who know that you are likely to get into this zone on exam day, tend to confront every negative thought with a positive affirmation. They constantly tell themselves that – things are going great, the reader will love their essay and that they are confident they have answered the last question in the correct manner. This approach isn’t necessarily the healthy one either.

The right way to go about dealing with your self-confidence issues would be to prevent the negative thoughts from creeping up in the first place. When preparing for your GMAT, you also need to work on adopting an attitude of unwavering superiority. You needn’t be painfully smug to your peers and colleagues, but keep these thoughts to yourself as long as they help you positively reinforce the idea of doing well in your exam.

Remind yourself that the questions are rather easy and that you have worked hard enough to appear for the test with great ease. If you aren’t able to answer a question, you can make an educated guess. Move on and don’t look back at the questions you have already answered.

In addition to this, it is also important that you are mindful of your body language. Your posture, how you place your legs and arms can all come together to make or break your performance even in a written exam. It is know that sitting upright, arms wide and legs spread out can cause your hormone levels to change allowing you to handle stress more effectively. Many of you will agree to this for sure!


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