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Want to study law? Take the GRE

Want to study law? Take the GRE

Yes, you read that correct. And no, the editors at QS LEAP have not gone on a vacation! Indeed, now you can take the GRE for admission to the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law. This makes the institute the first in the country to provide an alternative to LSAT for prospective law school students.

With this move, the University of Arizona wants to open up law school admissions to more students. Since many more students take the GRE, it gives the College a chance to attract a more diverse crowd in terms of ethnicity, social backgrounds and interest.

GRE a valid predictor for law school success?

According to information on the institute website, ETS conducted a study in December 2015 which revealed that the GRE General Test is a reliable predictor for student performance in the Arizona College of Law’s JD Program. It also meets the American Bar Association’s Legal Education Standard for admission. The College of Law has also submitted a formal notification to the American Bar Association (ABA) Section on Legal Education.

The ABA already allows US law schools to fill up to 10% of their class with students who have not appeared for the LSAT. Some schools have already taken advantage of this rule. However, the University of Arizona’s move becomes the first instance of a law school completely allowing a different alternative to students. The institute has not completely ditched the LSAT though, and will accept applications from LSAT takers as well.

Will other law schools follow?

Other law schools are expected to follow suit. Arizona College of Law has already invited Wake Forest University School of Law and University of Hawaii William S. Richardson School of Law to conduct similar studies with ETS. Their results should be published later this year.

However, critics are not entirely convinced. According to them, the fact that the study is done by the ETS means that it comes with an inherent bias. They think that the more serious law school aspirants will continue to take the LSAT. Moreover, they feel that only the mediocre students will apply to law schools with their GRE scores.

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